Consumer Packaged Goods - CPG

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DEFINITION of 'Consumer Packaged Goods - CPG'

A type of good that is consumed every day by the average consumer. The goods that comprise this category are ones that need to be replaced frequently, compared to those that are usable for extended periods of time. While CPGs represent a market that will always have consumers, it is highly competitive due to high market saturation and low consumer switching costs.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Consumer Packaged Goods - CPG'

The consumer packaged goods industry is one of the largest in North America, valued at approximately US$2 trillion. Although growth has slowed in this industry, companies that provide CPGs still benefit from large margins and strong balance sheets.

Some basic examples of CPGs are food and beverages, clothing, tobacco and household products.

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