Crack

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DEFINITION of 'Crack'

A trading strategy used in energy futures to establish a refining margin.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Crack'

By simultaneously purchasing crude oil futures and selling petroleum product futures, a trader is attempting to establish an artificial position in the refinement of oil, created through a spread.

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