Credence Good

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DEFINITION of 'Credence Good'

A type of good with qualities that cannot be observed by the consumer after purchase, making it difficult to assess its utility. Typical examples of credence goods include expert services such as medical procedures, automobile repairs and dietary supplements.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Credence Good'

Credence goods that do not perform as expected can have adverse consequences ranging from financial loss to ill-health and even death. For example, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration has, over the years, prohibited a number of dietary supplements from being marketed, either due to misleading advertising claims by their manufacturers, or because they could induce serious side-effects.

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