Credit Ticket

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Credit Ticket'

In accounting and bookkeeping, a credit ticket is a transaction that generates a credit in the general ledger. An example of a credit ticket would be a deposit in a bank account which would produce a credit on the general ledger.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Credit Ticket'

Credit tickets will have offsetting debit tickets, either simultaneously or in the very near future. The deposit in the bank account, for example, could be a payment for the sale of goods, and the offsetting debit would be in accounts receivable.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Work Ticket

    A form that shows the time spent by an employee working on a ...
  2. Credit Sweep

    Also known as an automated credit sweep, this term refers to ...
  3. Asset Ledger

    The part of a company's accounting records that detail the journal ...
  4. Accounting Records

    All of the documentation and books involved in the preparation ...
  5. Credit

    1. A contractual agreement in which a borrower receives something ...
  6. General Ledger

    A company's main accounting records. A general ledger is a complete ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do you calculate credits and debits in the general ledger?

    A general ledger acts as a record of all accounts and their transactions. Balancing the ledger involves subtracting the total ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Given a good bookkeeping system, would financial accounting be necessary?

    Bookkeeping and financial accounting may seem like they are new creations, but variations have been around for millennia. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why do accountants use debits and credits instead of simple pluses and minuses? Why ...

    Debits and credits, and the technique of double-entry accounting, are credited (no pun intended) to a Franciscan monk by ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of absorption costing?

    Companies must choose between using absorption costing or variable costing in their accounting systems. There are advantages ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between the cost of capital and the discount rate?

    The cost of capital refers to the actual cost of financing business activity through either debt or equity capital. The discount ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why does zero-based budgeting require ongoing evaluation and management?

    Zero-based budgeting must have ongoing evaluation and management due to the fact a zero-based budget requires management ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    12 Things You Need To Know About Financial Statements

    Discover how to keep score of companies to increase your chances of choosing a winner.
  2. Markets

    Using Accounting Analysis To Measure Earnings Quality

    Learn the accounting concepts that will help you to dig into to the details to find earnings manipulation.
  3. Markets

    Introduction To Fundamental Analysis

    Learn this easy-to-understand technique of analyzing a company's financial statements and reports.
  4. Options & Futures

    Advanced Financial Statement Analysis

    Learn what it means to do your homework on a company's performance and reporting practices before investing.
  5. Investing Basics

    Explaining Write-Downs

    A write-down is a reduction in the book value of an asset because it is overvalued compared to the market value.
  6. Economics

    What are Noncurrent Assets?

    Noncurrent assets are property that a company owns that will last for more than one year.
  7. Investing Basics

    How Much Do CPAs Make?

    If you're considering becoming a CPA, here's what you might expect to earn.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Activity-Based Costing

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is a managerial accounting method that assigns certain indirect costs to the products incurring the bulk of those costs.
  9. Economics

    What is a Contra Account?

    A contra account is an offset that reduces the value of a related account.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  2. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  3. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  4. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  5. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  6. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
Trading Center