Credit Ticket

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DEFINITION of 'Credit Ticket'

In accounting and bookkeeping, a credit ticket is a transaction that generates a credit in the general ledger. An example of a credit ticket would be a deposit in a bank account which would produce a credit on the general ledger.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Credit Ticket'

Credit tickets will have offsetting debit tickets, either simultaneously or in the very near future. The deposit in the bank account, for example, could be a payment for the sale of goods, and the offsetting debit would be in accounts receivable.

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