Credit Netting

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DEFINITION of 'Credit Netting'

A system whereby the number of credit checks on financial transactions is reduced by entering into agreements that simply net all transactions. These agreements are made between large banks and other financial institutions and place all current and future transactions into one agreement, removing the need for credit checks on each transaction.

BREAKING DOWN 'Credit Netting'

Most financial transactions that deal with credit involve credit checks to ensure that the borrowing party can meet the obligation of the transactions. However, due to the active nature of large market participants, the constant checking and rechecking of credit is not only time consuming, but also has the potential to create missed opportunities. The process becomes more efficient for all parties involved if they enter into larger scale agreements.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Why do commercial bills have higher yields than T-bills?

    The reason that commercial bills have higher yields than T-bills is due to the varying credit quality of each bill type. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What's the difference between a bank guarantee and a letter of credit?

    A bank guarantee and a letter of credit are similar in many ways but they're two different things. Letters of credit ensure ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does investment banking differ from commercial banking?

    Investment banking and commercial banking are two primary segments of the banking industry. Investment banks facilitate the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve?

    Commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve primarily to meet reserve requirements when their cash on hand is low before ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does a bank determine what my discretionary income is when making a loan decision?

    Discretionary income is the money left over from your gross income each month after taking out taxes and paying for necessities. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What role does a correspondent bank play in an international transaction?

    A correspondent bank is most typically used in international buy, sell or money transfer transactions to facilitate foreign ... Read Full Answer >>

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