Credo

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DEFINITION of 'Credo'

A Latin word which means "a set of fundamental beliefs or a guiding principle." For a company, a credo is like a mission statement.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Credo'

For example, Sam Walton, founder of Wal-Mart, established the "Three Basic Beliefs" as his company's credo. These are:

- Respect for the Individual
- Service to our Customers
- Strive for Excellence

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