Cross-Border Outstanding


DEFINITION of 'Cross-Border Outstanding'

Any loan, receivable or payment extended to or owed by a person or entity outside the domestic borders of a bank's or company's home country. The outstanding amount may be in the company's domestic currency or it may be in another currency.

BREAKING DOWN 'Cross-Border Outstanding'

For example, if Bank ABC in the U.S. lends money to Company XYZ's subsidiary in Mexico, this would be considered a cross-border outstanding loan. Bankers' acceptances are usually cross-border transactions due to their role in foreign trade.

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