Crossover Investor

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DEFINITION of 'Crossover Investor'

An investor who invests prior to, during and after a company's initial public offering. A crossover investor's goal is to get the highest returns possible, by investing in numerous stages of a business life cycle. Crossover investing strategies tend to be more popular within the technology industry. Crossover investors will be committed to the company they are investing in and stick with these companies for years.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Crossover Investor'

This investment strategy aims to increase returns by investing in a good company at numerous stages of its business life cycle. This is the direct opposite of the buy and hold method, where the investor does not trade between the period that a security is first bought and until it's finally sold. The crossover method aims to get the best returns during short term periods, while the buy and hold method focuses on long term growth.

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