Crossover Refunding

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Crossover Refunding'

A local government's issuance of new municipal bonds (called refunding bonds) in which the proceeds of the refunding bonds are placed in escrow and used to make debt service payments on the refunding bonds until the call date of the original bonds. At that point, the refunding bond proceeds cross over and are used to pay the principal and the call premium, in order to extinguish the original bonds.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Crossover Refunding'

When 90 days or fewer are left in the original bonds' terms, the refunding is called "current". When more than 90 days remain, the refunding is called "advance". Alternatives to a crossover refunding include net cash refunding, which is more common, and full cash or gross refunding, which is less common.


A locality might decide to refund its bonds in order to get a better interest rate, to get better debt covenants or to obtain a better debt service schedule.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  2. Indenture

    A legal and binding contract between a bond issuer and the bondholders.
  3. Municipal Bond Arbitrage

    A strategy that consists of building a portfolio of tax-exempt ...
  4. Bond Valuation

    A technique for determining the fair value of a particular bond. ...
  5. Tax-Exempt Security

    A security in which the income produced is free from federal, ...
  6. Municipal Bond

    A debt security issued by a state, municipality or county to ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a 'busted' convertible bond?

    In finance, a convertible bond represents a hybrid security that offers debt and equity features and risks. While a convertible ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Who or what is backing municipal bonds?

    Municipal bonds are backed by dedicated taxes or revenue sources related to specific projects, or by the full faith and credit ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How stable are municipal bonds?

    Stability is relative in the municipal bond market. Municipal bonds tend to be safer than many other types of investments, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the differences between debt and equity markets?

    The basic differences between the debt and equity markets include the type of financial interest they represent, the way ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does it signify if the term structure of an interest rate's curve is positive?

    When the term structure of interest rates is positive, it is a signal to economists the short-term yields on similar bonds ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What do cities do with the funds generated from municipal bonds?

    Funds generated from the sale of municipal bonds may go to provide for unspecified, general government financial needs, or ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    The Basics Of Municipal Bonds

    Investing in these bonds may offer a tax-free income stream but they are not without risks.
  2. Taxes

    Avoid Tricky Tax Issues On Municipal Bonds

    Learn the rules every investor should know before buying into this "tax-free" investment.
  3. Taxes

    Weighing The Tax Benefits Of Municipal Securities

    Find out how to determine whether the tax exemption offered by "munis" benefits you.
  4. Investing Basics

    8 Ways To Lose Money On Bonds

    Find out how to lose money on bonds, so you can avoid losses in the future.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Direxion Daily 20 Year Treasury

    Read about one potent, yet volatile, way to bet on rising interest rates -- the Direxion Daily 20 Year Plus Treasury Bear 3X exchange-traded fund (TMV).
  6. Bonds & Fixed Income

    What are Floating-Rate Notes?

    A floating-rate note is a debt instrument with an interest rate that “floats,” or varies. They are also called floaters.
  7. Investing

    Five Portfolio Moves For The Second Half

    After a relatively calm few months, market volatility is back. If you are an investor, we help you prepare your portfolio with these five portfolio moves.
  8. Stock Analysis

    Top 5 Emerging Market Bond ETFs

    The high growth potential of emerging markets makes these five ETFs popular among risk-tolerant investors.
  9. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Junk Bonds: Does High Yield Equal Extreme Risk?

    High-yield bonds present a lot of risks but do they outweigh the rewards? Here are some ETFs to consider, with caution.
  10. Economics

    How An Aging World Can Impact Your Portfolio

    It can be easy for investors to lose sight of longer-term, structural developments in favor of more ephemeral trends and fads in the financial markets.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  2. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  3. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  4. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
  5. Sin Tax

    A state-sponsored tax that is added to products or services that are seen as vices, such as alcohol, tobacco and gambling. ...
  6. Grandfathered Activities

    Nonbank activities, some of which would normally not be permissible for bank holding companies and foreign banks in the United ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!