Canadian Securities Administrators - CSA

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DEFINITION of 'Canadian Securities Administrators - CSA'

A collective forum composed of all the provincial and territorial securities regulators of Canada. The CSA's main goal is to collaborate on the creation and harmonization of securities regulations across Canada. In addition to its regulation-related functions, the organization seeks to better educate the public on all aspects of the Canadian securities market.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Canadian Securities Administrators - CSA'

As of 2008, there are 13 different securities regulators (representing each of the 10 Canadian provinces and three Canadian territories) that are part of the CSA.

The CSA also maintains the System for Electronic Document Analysis and Retrieval (SEDAR), which is a publicly accessible database that contains the various filings related to publicly traded Canadian companies.

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