Canadian Securities Course™ - CSC™

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DEFINITION of 'Canadian Securities Course™ - CSC™'

An entry-level program offered by the Canadian Securities Institute (CSI) that allows an individual to become a qualified mutual fund representative.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Canadian Securities Course™ - CSC™'

The CSCTM is often the first step for Canadian individuals wishing to pursue a career that involves trading securities and providing investment advice to clients. The CSCTM involves two exams, referred to as Volume 1 and Volume 2, each of which includes 100 multiple-choice questions within two hours.

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