Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange - CSCE


DEFINITION of 'Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange - CSCE'

A commodities exchange formed in 1979 for trading coffee, sugar and cocoa futures. The exchange has its roots in the 1882 Coffee Exchange, which added sugar in 1914 and cocoa in 1979. In 1998, the CSCE became a subsidiary of the New York Board of Trade, where it traded both futures and options. Since 2007, NYBOT has been a wholly-owned subsidiary of Intercontinental Exchange (ICE). The ICE operates several exchanges, trading platforms and clearing houses using an electronic trading platform.

BREAKING DOWN 'Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange - CSCE'

Coffee, sugar and cocoa are considered soft commodities because they are grown, not mined. Trading in soft commodities generally depends on supply and demand in markets just like hard commodity trading.

  1. Futures Market

    An auction market in which participants buy and sell commodity/future ...
  2. Intercontinental Exchange - ICE

    A market based in Atlanta, Georgia that facilitates the electronic ...
  3. Commodities Exchange

    An entity, usually an incorporated non-profit association, that ...
  4. New York Board Of Trade - NYBOT

    A commodities exchange in New York that trades futures and options ...
  5. Soft Commodity

    A commodity such as coffee, cocoa, sugar and fruit. This term ...
  6. Swap

    A derivative contract through which two parties exchange financial ...
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