China Securities Regulatory Commission - CSRC


DEFINITION of 'China Securities Regulatory Commission - CSRC'

The main securities regulatory body in China, which was created in 1992 and governs over all securities exchanges and futures markets activity within the People's Republic of China. Similar in its charge to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the CSRC is mandated to perform functions such as:

-Creating and reviewing securities legislation
-Regulating the trading, issuing, and settlement of stocks, fixed income securities, and securities funds
-Supervising the conduct of shareholders and securities brokers
-Overseeing the issuance of overseas company listings and offerings (such as H-Shares listed on the Hong Kong Exchange)

The CSRC includes more than 30 regulatory bureaus that cover different geographic regions of the country, and two supervisory bureaus at the nation's two largest stock exchanges in Shanghai and Shenzhen.

BREAKING DOWN 'China Securities Regulatory Commission - CSRC'

The CSRC has a close working relationship with the SEC; the SEC provides ongoing training and technical support to the younger CSRC and both groups work to facilitate cross-listing among companies in both nations.

As China becomes increasingly important to the global economy, it becomes more important that the Chinese securities markets be safe, liquid and transparent.

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