Customer Type Indicator Codes - CTI

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DEFINITION of 'Customer Type Indicator Codes - CTI'

A system that uses four different codes to indicate the types of transactions that, on futures exchanges, are made by brokers on behalf of different clients and themselves.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Customer Type Indicator Codes - CTI'

These codes distinguish for whom and on what type of account the trades are being placed. All of this data is included in the trade register report produced by the clearing organization.

Here are the four coded categories:
1. Member trades on their own accounts.
2. Clearing-member trades for proprietary accounts.
3. Member trades for other members presently upon the trading floor or for a controlled account of that member.
4. Member trades for customer accounts.

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