Current Assets

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DEFINITION of 'Current Assets'

1. A balance sheet account that represents the value of all assets that are reasonably expected to be converted into cash within one year in the normal course of business. Current assets include cash, accounts receivable, inventory, marketable securities, prepaid expenses and other liquid assets that can be readily converted to cash.

2. In personal finance, current assets are all assets that a person can readily convert to cash to pay outstanding debts and cover liabilities without having to sell fixed assets.

In the United Kingdom, current assets are also known as "current accounts."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Current Assets'

1. Current assets are important to businesses because they are the assets that are used to fund day-to-day operations and pay ongoing expenses. Depending on the nature of the business, current assets can range from barrels of crude oil, to baked goods, to foreign currency.

2. In personal finance, current assets include cash on hand and in the bank, and marketable securities that are not tied up in long-term investments. In other words, current assets are anything of value that is highly liquid.

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  4. What is the difference between current and noncurrent assets?

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  5. What is the difference between current assets and fixed assets?

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  6. How do I calculate current liabilities in Excel?

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  7. When are current assets converted to liquid assets?

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  9. What is the difference between a fixed asset and a current asset?

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  10. What is the difference between tangible and intangible assets?

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  11. What happens if a company doesn't think it will collect on some of its receivables?

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