Current Maturity

DEFINITION of 'Current Maturity'

The interval between the present date and the maturity date of a bond. The current maturity tells how long the bond has left until it matures, and it is an important metric for determining a bond's valuation. The longer the time until maturity, the more interest payments that can be expected. In a normal company, there could be several bonds with staggered current maturities resulting in bonds expiring at different times.

BREAKING DOWN 'Current Maturity'

There are different types of maturities that investors use when referring to bonds. Current maturity is how much time is left, but "original maturity" is the time between the issue date and the maturity date. For example, in 2013, a bond that was issued in 2010 with a maturity date in 2030 would have a current maturity of 17 years (2030-2013), and the original maturity would be 20 years (2030-2010).

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