Current Ratio

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Current Ratio'

A liquidity ratio that measures a company's ability to pay short-term obligations.

The Current Ratio formula is:

 

Current Ratio

Also known as "liquidity ratio", "cash asset ratio" and "cash ratio".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Current Ratio'

The ratio is mainly used to give an idea of the company's ability to pay back its short-term liabilities (debt and payables) with its short-term assets (cash, inventory, receivables). The higher the current ratio, the more capable the company is of paying its obligations. A ratio under 1 suggests that the company would be unable to pay off its obligations if they came due at that point. While this shows the company is not in good financial health, it does not necessarily mean that it will go bankrupt - as there are many ways to access financing - but it is definitely not a good sign.

The current ratio can give a sense of the efficiency of a company's operating cycle or its ability to turn its product into cash. Companies that have trouble getting paid on their receivables or have long inventory turnover can run into liquidity problems because they are unable to alleviate their obligations. Because business operations differ in each industry, it is always more useful to compare companies within the same industry.

This ratio is similar to the acid-test ratio except that the acid-test ratio does not include inventory and prepaids as assets that can be liquidated. The components of current ratio (current assets and current liabilities) can be used to derive working capital (difference between current assets and current liabilities). Working capital is frequently used to derive the working capital ratio, which is working capital as a ratio of sales.

Want to learn more about how to use Current Ratio? Take a look at -- Liquidity Measurement Ratios: Current Ratio and How To Analyze A Company's Financial Position.

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Correlation

    In the world of finance, a statistical measure of how two securities move in relation to each other. Correlations are used ...
  2. Letter Of Credit

    A letter from a bank guaranteeing that a buyer's payment to a seller will be received on time and for the correct amount. ...
  3. Due Diligence - DD

    1. An investigation or audit of a potential investment. Due diligence serves to confirm all material facts in regards to ...
  4. Certificate Of Deposit - CD

    A savings certificate entitling the bearer to receive interest. A CD bears a maturity date, a specified fixed interest rate ...
  5. Days Sales Of Inventory - DSI

    A financial measure of a company's performance that gives investors an idea of how long it takes a company to turn its inventory ...
  6. Accounts Payable - AP

    An accounting entry that represents an entity's obligation to pay off a short-term debt to its creditors. The accounts payable ...
Trading Center