Customs Barrier

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Customs Barrier'

Any measure designed to limit international trade. A customs barrier will act to limit the level of trade across international borders by implementing restrictions on imports and/or exports. Governments may impose such restrictions in order to protect a domestic industry from foreign competition, or to limit the export of goods or services deemed vital to a domestic economy's health.

Also known as a "trade barrier".

BREAKING DOWN 'Customs Barrier'

Types of customs barrier can include tariffs, levies, duties and trade embargos. While most economists are in agreement that such measures ultimately create less-than-optimal economic conditions, governments often resort to them for a variety of reasons, ranging from protecting an infant industry to engaging in a trade war with another country.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Balanced Trade

    A condition in which an economy runs neither a trade surplus ...
  2. Tariff War

    An economic battle between two countries in which Country A raises ...
  3. Anti-Dumping Duty

    A protectionist tariff that a domestic government imposes on ...
  4. Price War

    When companies continuously lower prices to undercut the competition. ...
  5. Import Duty

    A tax collected on imports and some exports by the customs authorities ...
  6. Nontariff Barrier

    A form of restrictive trade where barriers to trade are set up ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    The Economics Of Labor Mobility

    Loosening labor restrictions has both good and bad effects for a country and its workers.
  2. Economics

    Understanding Supply-Side Economics

    Does the amount of goods and services produced set the pace for economic growth? Here are the arguments.
  3. Economics

    The History Of Economic Thought

    Economics is a vital part of every day life. Discover the major players who shaped its development.
  4. Economics

    The Basics Of Tariffs And Trade Barriers

    Everything you need to know - from the different types of tariffs to their effects on the local economy.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Hamburger Economics: The Big Mac Index

    In theory, PPP stands up much better than it does in reality. Find out how to evaluate currencies according to the price of a Big Mac.
  6. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  7. Investing Basics

    Explaining Trade Liberalization

    Trade liberalization is the process of removing or reducing obstacles that impede the exchange of goods and services between nations.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Strategic Alliances

    A strategic alliance is a business relationship between two or more entities that share recourses for a common goal.
  9. Investing

    What’s Holding Back the U.S. Consumer

    Even as job growth has surged and gasoline prices have plunged, U.S. consumers are proving slow to respond and repair their overextended balance sheets.
  10. Economics

    The Problem With Today’s Headline Economic Data

    Headwinds have kept the U.S. growth more moderate than in the past–including leverage levels and an aging population—and the latest GDP revisions prove it.
RELATED FAQS
  1. When has the United States run its largest trade deficits?

    In macroeconomics, balance of trade is one of the leading economic metrics that determines the trading relationship of a ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Which is more important to a nation's economy, the balance of trade or the balance ...

    There is no question the composition of a country's balance of payments is more important than its balance of trade. This ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between cost and freight (CFR) and cost, insurance and freight ...

    The difference between cost and freight (CFR) and cost, insurance and freight (CIF) is essentially the requirement under ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between Cost and Freight (CFR) and Free on Board (FOB)?

    The difference between cost and freight (CFR) and free on board (FOB) lies in who has responsibility for various shipping ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the ethical arguments against government subsidies to companies like Tesla?

    The ethical argument behind government subsidies is that they should be put into place to help industries that will, in turn, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can tariffs cause inefficiencies in domestic industries?

    Any government regulation naturally creates inefficiencies in a pure supply and demand marketplace. When it comes to the ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  2. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  3. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
  4. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  5. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  6. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!