Cash Value Added - CVA

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DEFINITION of 'Cash Value Added - CVA'

A measure of the amount of cash generated by a company through its operations. It is computed by subtracting the 'operating cash flow demand' from the 'operating cash flow' from the cash flow statement.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Cash Value Added - CVA'

Cash value added is similar to economic value added but takes into consideration only cash generation as a opposed to economic wealth generation. This measure helps give investors an idea of the ability of a company to generate cash from one period to another. Generally speaking, the higher the CVA the better it is for the company and for investors.

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