Contingent Value Rights - CVR

What are 'Contingent Value Rights - CVR'

Contingent value rights (CVR) are a type of rights given to shareholders of an acquired company (or a company facing major restructuring) that ensures they receive additional benefit if a specified event occurs. A contingent value right is similar to an option because it often has an expiration date that relates to the time the contingent event must occur.

BREAKING DOWN 'Contingent Value Rights - CVR'

For example, shareholders of an acquired company may receive a CVR that enables them to receive additional shares of the target company in the event that target company's share price falls below a certain level by a specified date.

Another example of a CVR would be for a target company to set aside a large sum of money that would be transferred to the shareholders of the acquired company in the event that the price of the target company's shares do not meet a certain target or fall below a specified price.

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