Day-Around Order

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Day-Around Order'

An order that cancels and replaces a previously submitted day order, producing a new request with an adjusted volume or price limit. The term is primarily used by traders in the general equities market. As with a day order, the day-around will expire by the end of the business day.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Day-Around Order'

A day-around order simplifies the cancellation and reorder process in trading by combining a cancel order form with a day order. For example, let's say that an investor submits a day order to purchase stock XYZ with a limit at $50. The investor hears some detrimental news surrounding company XYZ and wants to lower the limit on the day order. Instead of submitting a cancel order form and submitting another day order, the investor can simply submit a day-around order with a new limit price.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Limit Order

    An order placed with a brokerage to buy or sell a set number ...
  2. Cancel Former Order - CFO

    An order from an investor to a broker, to cancel a previously ...
  3. Day Order

    An order to buy or sell a security that automatically expires ...
  4. Market Order

    An order that an investor makes through a broker or brokerage ...
  5. Volume

    The number of shares or contracts traded in a security or an ...
  6. Forex Spread Betting

    A category of spread betting that involves taking a bet on the ...
Related Articles
  1. Principal Trading and Agency Trading
    Investing Basics

    Principal Trading and Agency Trading

  2. Understanding Order Execution
    Investing Basics

    Understanding Order Execution

  3. The Basics Of Trading A Stock
    Active Trading Fundamentals

    The Basics Of Trading A Stock

  4. How Trading Algorithms Are Created
    Trading Strategies

    How Trading Algorithms Are Created

Hot Definitions
  1. Gross Rate Of Return

    The total rate of return on an investment before the deduction of any fees or expenses. The gross rate of return is quoted ...
  2. Debit Spread

    Two options with different market prices that an investor trades on the same underlying security. The higher priced option ...
  3. Leading Indicator

    A measurable economic factor that changes before the economy starts to follow a particular pattern or trend. Leading indicators ...
  4. Wage-Price Spiral

    A macroeconomic theory to explain the cause-and-effect relationship between rising wages and rising prices, or inflation. ...
  5. Accelerated Depreciation

    Any method of depreciation used for accounting or income tax purposes that allows greater deductions in the earlier years ...
  6. Call Risk

    The risk, faced by a holder of a callable bond, that a bond issuer will take advantage of the callable bond feature and redeem ...
Trading Center