Day Loan


DEFINITION of 'Day Loan'

A temporary transfer of funds from a bank to an individual broker or a brokerage firm that is made early in the day for the purchase of securities that same day. The securities serve as collateral for the day loan, which must be repaid by the end of the day.

Also called a "morning loan".


A day loan is a source of very short-term funding. Once the securities have been purchased, the loan becomes a regular broker call loan, and may become due at any time. Brokers must pay a daily interest rate, known as the "call rate", on these loans.

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