Dividend Discount Model - DDM

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DEFINITION of 'Dividend Discount Model - DDM'

A procedure for valuing the price of a stock by using predicted dividends and discounting them back to present value. The idea is that if the value obtained from the DDM is higher than what the shares are currently trading at, then the stock is undervalued.

Dividend Discount Model (DDM)

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dividend Discount Model - DDM'

This procedure has many variations, and it doesn't work for companies that don't pay out dividends. For example one variation is the supernormal dividend growth model which takes into account a period of high growth followed by a lower, constant growth period. The principal behind the model is the net present value of the cash flows. To get a growth number, one option is to take the return on equity (ROE) and multiply it by the retention ratio (which is 1-the payout ratio).

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