De Jure Corporation

AAA

DEFINITION of 'De Jure Corporation'

A business that has fulfilled its requirements for formation according to the regulations for earning a state charter. De jure, meaning "a matter of law," indicates that the company has been fully and legally chartered, and is therefore entitled to do business. A government's granting of a charter assumes that the de jure corporation will remain in compliance; however, while unusual, certain circumstances may lead to the revocation of the charter.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'De Jure Corporation'

A de jure corporation is one that is lawfully chartered by a state government, and is recognized as a corporation for all purposes. Du jure is opposed to de facto, which connotes "as a matter of practice not founded on law." A de facto corporation generally acts in good faith but has failed to comply with the technical requirements for becoming a de jure corporation.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Articles Of Incorporation

    A set of documents filed with a government body to legally document ...
  2. Ultra Vires Acts

    Any act that lies beyond the authority of a corporation to perform. ...
  3. Corporate Charter

    A written document filed with a U.S. state by the founders of ...
  4. Corporation

    A legal entity that is separate and distinct from its owners. ...
  5. Corporate Finance

    1) The financial activities related to running a corporation. ...
  6. Cumis Counsel

    Legal counsel chosen by the insured when the insurer has a conflict ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. No results found.
Related Articles
  1. Entrepreneurship

    Are You An Entrepreneur?

    Many people want to start a business, but not everyone has what it takes to succeed.
  2. Entrepreneurship

    Business Startup Costs: It's In The Details

    Don't overlook the details when starting up a business. It's the small expenses that have the potential to make or break a great idea.
  3. Investing

    What's a Debit Note?

    A debit note is a document used by a seller to inform a purchaser of a dollar amount owed. As the name indicates, it is a note from the seller that a debit has been made to the purchaser’s account. ...
  4. Professionals

    What does C-Suite Mean?

    C-Suite is a slang term used to describe the highest level senior executives of a corporation. This is the decision-making, power center of a company. These individuals are usually paid well, ...
  5. Investing

    What's a Monopolistic Market?

    A monopolistic market has a significant number of characteristics of a pure monopoly. Though there may be more than one supplier, the market has high prices, suppliers tightly control availability ...
  6. Professionals

    What's Human Capital?

    Human capital is a company asset, but it’s not listed on the balance sheet. Human capital is all of the creative skills and knowledge embodied in the employees of a company -- skills that bring ...
  7. Investing

    What's Capitalization?

    Capitalization has different meanings depending on the context.
  8. Investing

    Deferred Tax Liability

    Deferred tax liability is a tax that has been assessed or is due for the current period, but has not yet been paid. The deferral arises because of timing differences between the accrual of the ...
  9. Economics

    The Impact Of Ending The US Embargo On Cuba

    Many argue that ending the US embargo on Cuba will not only make US consumers happy, but also help the US economy and bring more freedoms to Cuba.
  10. Economics

    Popular Places Where U.S. Citizens Need A Visa

    A U.S. passport will get you into many countries, but not everywhere. Here's how to visit five of the most popular destinations that require visas.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  2. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  3. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  4. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
  5. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's costs of production by assessing the input costs of each step ...
  6. Law Of Supply

    A microeconomic law stating that, all other factors being equal, as the price of a good or service increases, the quantity ...
Trading Center