Dealer Bank

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DEFINITION of 'Dealer Bank'

A commercial bank authorized to buy and sell government debt securities including federal and municipal bonds. This debt is usually issued to fund large government projects such as road and bridge construction. Dealer banks are registered with the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board.

BREAKING DOWN 'Dealer Bank'

Income from municipal bonds is usually exempt from federal income taxes in addition to being virtually risk-free with a near zero default rate.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Where can I buy government bonds?

    The type of bond determines where you can purchase it, so you need to decide which type of bond you would like to purchase ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What's the difference between short-term investments in marketable securities and ...

    Most of the time, when an investor or analyst searches through the financial statements of a publicly traded company, he ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are long-term U.S. government bonds risk-free?

    For any debt obligation to be considered completely risk-free, investors must have full faith that the principal and interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the relationship between the current yield and risk?

    The general relationship between current yield and risk is that they increase in correlation to one another. A higher current ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does investment banking differ from commercial banking?

    Investment banking and commercial banking are two primary segments of the banking industry. Investment banks facilitate the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why do commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve?

    Commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve primarily to meet reserve requirements when their cash on hand is low before ... Read Full Answer >>

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