Dealer Incentive

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DEFINITION of 'Dealer Incentive'

A corporate sales strategy in which the price a dealer has to pay a manufacturer for a particular product is reduced, allowing the dealer to make a higher profit or to reduce the price at which the product is sold to consumers. Dealer incentives can be tied to certain sales quotas, meaning that the dealer will only receive the incentive when a certain number of units is sold.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dealer Incentive'

Dealer incentives are often associated with the automobile industry. Manufacturers will reduce the price a dealer has to pay for a particular vehicle model in the hope of increasing the sales volume of that model. If the dealer charges the end consumer the same price but pays less to acquire the model, then the dealer earns a higher profit. The dealer can also pass the cost savings to the consumer, but may not be required to do so.

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