Dean Analytic Schedule

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DEFINITION of 'Dean Analytic Schedule'

A method of rating fire insurance policies based on various physical fire hazards. The Dean Analytic Schedule was the first predetermined insurance schedule that assigns a rating to a given policy using thorough, qualitative analysis.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Dean Analytic Schedule'

This schedule was originally published by A.F. Dean in 1902. The schedule is seldom used by modern insurance companies. Most carriers have since developed their own custom schedules or instead use the one provided by the Insurance Services Office.

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