Dear Money


DEFINITION of 'Dear Money'

A situation in which money or loans are very difficult to obtain in a given country. If you do have the opportunity to secure a loan, then interest rates are usually extremely high. Also known as "tight money".


This situation can be a result of a restricted money supply, causing interest rates to be pushed up due to the forces of supply and demand. Businesses may have a tough time raising capital during a period of dear money.

  1. Cheap Money

    A loan or credit with a low interest rate, or the setting of ...
  2. Money Supply

    The entire stock of currency and other liquid instruments in ...
  3. Tight Money

    A situation in which money or loans are very difficult to obtain ...
  4. Loan

    The act of giving money, property or other material goods to ...
  5. Interest Rate

    The amount charged, expressed as a percentage of principal, by ...
  6. Deficit

    The amount by which a resource falls short of a mark, most often ...
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