Death Star IPO

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DEFINITION of 'Death Star IPO'

A company's highly anticipated initial public offering (IPO) that becomes a blockbuster with investors. The Death Star IPO is a reference to the DS-1 Orbital Battle Station, also more popularly know as the "Death Star," from the movie "Star Wars." This planetary weapon had the ability to destroy entire planets with a single beam, resulting in a massive explosion. In the stock market, stocks that have the ability to explode out of the gate are usually highly anticipated tech stocks, although stocks from other sectors can also fit the bill.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Death Star IPO'

Broadly speaking, to be considered a Death Star IPO, the IPO would have to be a multi-billion dollar offering that is also in very high demand with investors. Some examples of Death Star IPOs include Google's IPO in 2004 and Yahoo! in 1996. Both IPOs were highly anticipated events and both stocks exploded on stock markets once the shares became publicly available.

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