Debt Cancellation Contract

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DEFINITION of 'Debt Cancellation Contract'

A contract in which a bank agrees to cancel all or part of a customer's obligation to repay a loan due to an event such as death, disability or involuntary loss of employment. A debt cancellation contract is an alternative to a life insurance plan.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Debt Cancellation Contract'

Debt cancellation contracts are a product that banks offer in lieu of credit insurance plans for credit cards and other forms of bank credit. Instead of credit insurance premiums, the customer pays the bank a fee.

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