Debit

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DEFINITION of 'Debit'

An accounting entry that results in either an increase in assets or a decrease in liabilities on a company's balance sheet or in your bank account. A debit on an accounting entry will have opposite effects on the balance depending on whether it is done to assets or liabilities, with a debit to assets indicating an increase and vice versa for liabilities.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Debit'

In fundamental accounting, debits are balanced by credits, which operate in the exact opposite direction. When a debit is made to one account of a financial statement, a corresponding credit must occur on an opposing account. This is the fundamental law of bookkeeping accounting. For instance, if a firm were to take a loan to purchase equipment, one would debit fixed assets and credit a liabilities account, depending on the nature of the loan.

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