Debit

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DEFINITION of 'Debit'

An accounting entry that results in either an increase in assets or a decrease in liabilities on a company's balance sheet or in your bank account. A debit on an accounting entry will have opposite effects on the balance depending on whether it is done to assets or liabilities, with a debit to assets indicating an increase and vice versa for liabilities.

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BREAKING DOWN 'Debit'

In fundamental accounting, debits are balanced by credits, which operate in the exact opposite direction. When a debit is made to one account of a financial statement, a corresponding credit must occur on an opposing account. This is the fundamental law of bookkeeping accounting. For instance, if a firm were to take a loan to purchase equipment, one would debit fixed assets and credit a liabilities account, depending on the nature of the loan.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What happens when my bank account is debited?

    When your bank account is debited, it means money is taken out of the account. The opposite of a debit is a credit, in which ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What's the difference between a cash account and a margin account?

    The main difference between a cash account and a margin account is that in a cash account all transactions must be made with ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the formula for calculating compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in Excel?

    The compound annual growth rate, or CAGR for short, measures the return on an investment over a certain period of time. Below ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>
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