Debris Removal Insurance

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Debris Removal Insurance'

A section of a property insurance policy that provides reimbursement for clean-up costs associated with damage to a property. Policies with a debris removal provision typically only cover debris resulting from an insured peril, such as charred wood from a building fire.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Debris Removal Insurance'

Policies commonly have a cap on the amount of reimbursement that a policyholder can receive for debris removal costs. While policies typically have debris removal as a standard provision, the policyholder is often able to purchase additional coverage.


The policy provision may also extend to the removal of hazardous materials that may cover the property, but could exclude pollutants.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Commercial Property Insurance

    Insurance that is used to cover any type of commercial property. ...
  2. Commercial Multiple Peril Policy

    A commercial insurance policy that offers at least two forms ...
  3. Commercial Real Estate

    Property that is used solely for business purposes. Examples ...
  4. Insurance

    A contract (policy) in which an individual or entity receives ...
  5. Disaster Loss

    A special type of tax-deductible loss, similar to a casualty ...
  6. Losses and Loss-Adjustment Expense

    The portion of an insurance company’s reserves set aside for ...
Related Articles
  1. Deducting Disaster: Casualty And Theft ...
    Taxes

    Deducting Disaster: Casualty And Theft ...

  2. Preparing Your Finances From Natural ...
    Home & Auto

    Preparing Your Finances From Natural ...

  3. With HO5 Insurance, You're In Charge
    Insurance

    With HO5 Insurance, You're In Charge

  4. Cut Taxes By Reporting Property Damage
    Taxes

    Cut Taxes By Reporting Property Damage

Hot Definitions
  1. Leading Indicator

    A measurable economic factor that changes before the economy starts to follow a particular pattern or trend. Leading indicators ...
  2. Wage-Price Spiral

    A macroeconomic theory to explain the cause-and-effect relationship between rising wages and rising prices, or inflation. ...
  3. Accelerated Depreciation

    Any method of depreciation used for accounting or income tax purposes that allows greater deductions in the earlier years ...
  4. Call Risk

    The risk, faced by a holder of a callable bond, that a bond issuer will take advantage of the callable bond feature and redeem ...
  5. Parity Price

    When the price of an asset is directly linked to another price. Examples of parity price are: 1. Convertibles - the price ...
  6. Earnings Multiplier

    An adjustment made to a company's P/E ratio that takes into account current interest rates. The earnings multiplier is used ...
Trading Center