Debris Removal Insurance

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DEFINITION of 'Debris Removal Insurance'

A section of a property insurance policy that provides reimbursement for clean-up costs associated with damage to a property. Policies with a debris removal provision typically only cover debris resulting from an insured peril, such as charred wood from a building fire.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Debris Removal Insurance'

Policies commonly have a cap on the amount of reimbursement that a policyholder can receive for debris removal costs. While policies typically have debris removal as a standard provision, the policyholder is often able to purchase additional coverage.


The policy provision may also extend to the removal of hazardous materials that may cover the property, but could exclude pollutants.

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