A measure of a company's ability to pay off its incurred debt. This ratio gives the investor the approximate amount of time that would be needed to pay off all debt, ignoring the factors of interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization.



Debt/EBITDA is a common metric used by credit rating agencies to assess the probability of defaulting on issued debt. A high debt/EBITDA ratio suggests that a firm may not be able to service their debt in an appropriate manner and can result in a lowered credit rating. Conversely, a low ratio can suggest that the firm may want take on more debt if needed and it often warrants a relatively high credit rating.

  1. Debt/Equity Ratio

    Debt/Equity Ratio is debt ratio used to measure a company's financial ...
  2. Credit Rating

    An assessment of the credit worthiness of a borrower in general ...
  3. Debt

    An amount of money borrowed by one party from another. Many corporations/individuals ...
  4. Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, ...

    An indicator of a company's financial performance which is calculated ...
  5. Leverage

    1. The use of various financial instruments or borrowed capital, ...
  6. EBITA

    Earnings before interest, taxes and amortization. To calculate ...
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  1. Does working capital include inventory?

    A company's working capital includes inventory, and increases in inventory make working capital increase. Working capital ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are dividends considered an asset?

    Whether dividends paid on stock are considered an asset depends on which role you play in the investment: the issuing company ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Who actually declares a dividend?

    It is a company's board of directors who actually declares a dividend. The declaration date is the first of four important ... Read Full Answer >>

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