Debt-To-GDP Ratio

What is the 'Debt-To-GDP Ratio'

The debt-to-GDP ratio is the ratio of a country's national debt to its gross domestic product (GDP). By comparing what a country owes to what it produces, the debt-to-GDP ratio indicates the country's ability to pay back its debt. Often expressed as a percentage, the ratio can be interpreted as the number of years needed to pay back debt if GDP is dedicated entirely to debt repayment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Debt-To-GDP Ratio'

Economists have not identified a specific debt-to-GDP ratio as being ideal, and instead focus on the sustainability of certain debt levels. If a country can continue to pay interest on its debt without refinancing or harming economic growth, it is generally considered to be stable. A high debt-to-GDP ratio may make it more difficult for a country to pay external debts, and may lead creditors to seek higher interest rates when lending. If a country were unable to pay its debt, it would default, which could cause a panic in the domestic and international markets. The higher the debt-to-GDP ratio, the less likely the country will pay its debt back, and the higher its risk of default.

While governments may strive to have low debt-to-GDP ratios, government borrowing may increase in times of war or recession - a macroeconomic strategy attributed to Keynesian economics.

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