Debt Instrument

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Debt Instrument'

A paper or electronic obligation that enables the issuing party to raise funds by promising to repay a lender in accordance with terms of a contract. Types of debt instruments include notes, bonds, certificates, mortgages, leases or other agreements between a lender and a borrower.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Debt Instrument'

Debt instruments are a way for markets and participants to easily transfer the ownership of debt obligations from one party to another. Debt obligation transferability increases liquidity and gives creditors a means of trading debt obligations on the market. Without debt instruments acting as a means to facilitate trading, debt is an obligation from one party to another. When a debt instrument is used as a medium to facilitate debt trading, debt obligations can be moved from one party to another quickly and efficiently.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  2. Nonpar Item

    A check, draft or negotiable instrument that a paying bank honors ...
  3. Debt

    An amount of money borrowed by one party from another. Many corporations/individuals ...
  4. Note

    A financial security that generally has a longer term than a ...
  5. Interest

    1. The charge for the privilege of borrowing money, typically ...
  6. Loan

    The act of giving money, property or other material goods to ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are some examples of debt instruments?

    Individuals, businesses and governments use common types of debt instruments, such as loans, bonds and debentures, to raise ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What impact does inflation have on the time value of money?

    The impact that inflation has on the time value of money is that inflation decreases the value of a dollar over time. The ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What's the difference between bills, notes and bonds?

    Treasury bills (T-Bills), notes and bonds are marketable securities the U.S. government sells in order to pay off maturing ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do companies issue debt and bonds? Can't they just borrow from the bank?

    Companies issue bonds to finance operations. Most companies can borrow from banks, but view direct borrowing from a bank ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What do people mean when they say debt is a relatively cheaper form of finance than ...

    In this case, the "cost" being referred to is the measurable cost of obtaining capital. With debt, this is the interest expense ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Are credit cards and debit cards considered debt instruments?

    Consumer debt instruments allow people to borrow money at specific interest rates. In recent years, the credit industry has ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Will Corporate Debt Drag Your Stock Down?

    Borrowed funds can mean a leg up for companies or the boot for investors. Find out how to tell the difference.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    5 Basic Things To Know About Bonds

    Learn these basic terms to breakdown this seemingly complex investment area.
  3. Options & Futures

    Principal-Protected Notes: Hedge Funds For Everyday Investors

    PPNs guarantee to return at least 100% of the original investment and have the potential to return much more.
  4. Options & Futures

    Common Bond-Buying Mistakes

    Avoid these errors made daily in bond portfolios everywhere.
  5. Professionals

    Why You Should Avoid Fixating on Bond Duration

    Financial advisors and their clients should then focus on a bond fund’s portfolio rather than relying on any single metric like duration.
  6. Investing

    The Case For Stocks Today

    Last week, U.S. equities advanced with the S&P 500 Index notching new records. Investors are now getting nervous with rate and currency volatility spiking.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Why You May Want To Be (And Stay) In Bonds

    Bonds are complicated, and it’s easy to feel intimidated or confused. Fortunately, you don’t need to be a numbers geek to be an informed investor.
  8. Home & Auto

    What Are The Tax Advantages Of Buying A Home?

    Don't forget these deductions and credits that homeowners can use to reduce their tax bill.
  9. Investing

    Why Some Investors Are Tilting Toward TIPS

    Last month’s five-year TIPS auction drew nearly $48 billion in interest, a sign of recent renewed demand for this inflation indexed asset among investors.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The EMAG Emerging Mkts Bond ETF: Worth the Risk?

    The Market Vectors Emerging Markets Aggregate Bond ETF (EMAG) might offer long-term rewards, but is now the best time to jump in?

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  2. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  3. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  4. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  5. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  6. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
Trading Center