Debtor In Possession - DIP


DEFINITION of 'Debtor In Possession - DIP'

An individual or corporation that has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and remains in control of property that a creditor has a lien against, or retains the power to operate a business. A debtor who files a Chapter 11 bankruptcy case becomes the debtor in possession (DIP). The DIP continues to run the business and has the powers and obligation of a trustee to operate in the best interest of any creditors. A DIP can operate in the ordinary course of business, but is required to seek court approval for any actions that fall outside of the scope of regular business activities. The DIP must also keep precise financial records and file appropriate tax returns.

BREAKING DOWN 'Debtor In Possession - DIP'

After filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, new bank accounts are opened that name the debtor in possession on the account. A debtor in possession can be terminated and the court will appoint a trustee in the event that assets are improperly managed or the debtor in possession is not following court orders. The United States Trustee's office maintains guidelines that specify the duties of a debtor in possession.

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