Declaration Date

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DEFINITION of 'Declaration Date'

1. The date on which the next dividend payment is announced by the directors of a company. This statement includes the dividend's size, ex-dividend date and payment date. It is also referred to as the "announcement date".

2. The last day on which the holder of an option must indicate whether he or she will exercise the option. Also known as the "expiration date."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS'Declaration Date'

1. Once it is authorized, the dividend is known as a declared dividend and it becomes the company's legal liability to pay it.

2. The declaration date of all listed stock options in the U.S. is on the third Friday of the listed month. If there is a holiday on the Friday, the declaration date falls on the third Thursday.

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