Declining Industry

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Declining Industry'

An industry where growth is either negative or is not growing at the broader rate of economic growth. There are many reasons for a declining industry: consumer demand may be steadily evaporating, the depletion of a natural resource may be occurring, or there may be the emergent substitutes because of technological innovation.

Declining Industry

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Declining Industry'

An example of a declining industry is the railroad industry, which has experienced decreased demand - largely due to newer and faster means of transporting goods (primarily air transport and trucking) - and has failed to remain competitive in pricing, at least in relation to the benefits of faster and more efficient transport provided by airlines and trucking services.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Business Cycle

    The fluctuations in economic activity that an economy experiences ...
  2. Sunrise Industry

    A colloquial term for a sector or business that is in its infancy, ...
  3. Growth Industry

    A sector of the economy experiencing a higher-than-average growth ...
  4. Emerging Industry

    A group of companies in a line of business formed around a new ...
  5. Mature Industry

    An industry which has passed both the emerging and the growth ...
  6. Industry Classification Benchmark ...

    A company-classification system for stocks developed by Dow Jones ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Industry Handbook

    In this feature, we take an in-depth look at the various techniques that determine the value and investment quality of companies from an industry perspective.
  2. Markets

    Great Company Or Growing Industry?

    Look at the big picture when choosing a company - what you see may really be a stage in its industry's growth.
  3. Mergers are not the same as acquisitions.
    Investing

    What's a Merger?

    Mergers are not the same as acquisitions. In an acquisition, one company buys and subsumes another company, leaving only the buyer in place. In most mergers, both companies merge to form an entirely ...
  4. As the number of new employees increases, the marginal product of an additional employee will at some point be less.
    Investing

    More is Less: Diminishing Marginal Returns

    In formal economic terms, the law of diminishing marginal returns states that as the number of new employees increases, the marginal product of an additional employee will at some point be less ...
  5. Typically, SPEs are subsidiaries of a larger corporation.
    Investing

    How Special Purpose Entities Help Fight Risk

    A special purpose entity, sometimes called a special purpose vehicle, is a legal entity created for one very limited, particular task. Typically, SPEs are subsidiaries of a larger corporation.
  6. SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats.
    Professionals

    What is a SWOT Analysis?

    SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. SWOT analysis is a management tool used to identify strategies for success. It may be used to guide individual thinking, group ...
  7. Accounting is the recording of financial transactions of a business or organization.
    Professionals

    What is Accounting?

    Accounting is the recording of financial transactions of a business or organization. It also includes the process of summarizing, analyzing and reporting these transactions in financial statements.
  8. What's a Multinational Corporation?
    Investing

    What's a Multinational Corporation?

    A multinational corporation is just that – a corporation that operates in multiple nations, with a home office that coordinates global management. Being a multinational corporation is a complicated ...
  9. What does Scarcity Mean?
    Economics

    Scarcity

    Scarcity is the basic economic problem that arises because people have unlimited wants, but resources are limited. Because of scarcity, various economic decisions must be made to allocate resources ...
  10. The law of supply and demand is one of the most basic principles in economics.
    Economics

    What is Supply & Demand?

    The law of supply and demand is one of the most basic principles in economics. In simplest terms, the law of supply and demand states that when an item is scarce, but many people want it, the ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Christmas Island Dollar

    The former currency of Christmas Island, an Australian island in the Indian Ocean that was discovered on December 25, 1643. ...
  2. Santa Claus Rally

    A surge in the price of stocks that often occurs in the week between Christmas and New Year's Day. There are numerous explanations ...
  3. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with other commodities of the same type. Commodities are most often ...
  4. Deferred Revenue

    Advance payments or unearned revenue, recorded on the recipient's balance sheet as a liability, until the services have been ...
  5. Multinational Corporation - MNC

    A corporation that has its facilities and other assets in at least one country other than its home country. Such companies ...
  6. SWOT Analysis

    A tool that identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of an organization. Specifically, SWOT is a basic, ...
Trading Center