Debt Exchangeable for Common Stock - DECS

DEFINITION of 'Debt Exchangeable for Common Stock - DECS'

A debt instrument that provides the holder with coupon payments in addition to an embedded short put option and a long call on the issuing company's stock.

BREAKING DOWN 'Debt Exchangeable for Common Stock - DECS'

DECS instruments provide the holder with the right to convert the security into the underlying company's common stock.

PRIDES securities are one example of debt exchangeable for common stock.

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