Deep Assortment

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DEFINITION of 'Deep Assortment'

A retail merchandising strategy in which the retailer stocks a number of varieties of a particular product line.


Carrying a deep assortment of a particular product can lead a company to becoming a "super specialist". It also limits the space for other products that would allow it to reduce its risk exposure. Some types of businesses are able to offer a deep assortment of a product while at the same time offering a wide variety of products.


Deep assortment is the opposite of shallow assortment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Deep Assortment'

A deep assortment of a particular product line may involve the company carrying a wide-array of colors and add-ons. A retailer using a deep assortment strategy may be known as a category killer if it focuses on a limited number of products, as it dominates a category of merchandise to such a degree that other businesses are unable to compete.

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