Deep Market

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DEFINITION of 'Deep Market'

A securities exchange, or place of commerce, where a large number of shares can be bought and sold without drastically affecting the price. A market might also refer to the buyers and sellers following a particular issue as well. For example, one could say that Microsoft has a deep market, whereas the typical bulletin board or pink sheets stock has a very thin market.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Deep Market'

Generally speaking, deep market stocks show greater price stability and fewer wild volume swings, like many of the issues traded on larger exchanges like the Nasdaq or the New York Stock Exchange. Conversely, thin market stocks, like those traded over the counter, tend to be much more volatile in both price and volume.

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