Default Model

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Default Model'

A type of model used by financial institutions to determine the likelihood of a default on credit obligations by a corporation or sovereign entity. These statistical models often use regression analysis (analyzing changes to certain market variables that are pertinent to a company's financial situation) to identify credit risk.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Default Model'

In most cases, when a default model is run, the result is given as the probability of default. However, other types of default models are used to predict a company's exposure-at-default and loss-given-default. These models predominantly are used by credit rating agencies such as Moody's and Standard & Poor's (S&P).

RELATED TERMS
  1. Credit Rating

    An assessment of the credit worthiness of a borrower in general ...
  2. Credit Cliff

    A slang term referring to the compounding of a company's credit ...
  3. Default Probability

    The degree of likelihood that the borrower of a loan or debt ...
  4. Asset Quality Rating

    A review or evaluation assessing the credit risk associated with ...
  5. Standard & Poor's - S&P

    The world's leading index provider and the foremost source of ...
  6. Merton Model

    A model, named after the financial scholar Robert C. Merton, ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between work in progress and work in process?

    Bayesian probability and analysis is an advanced statistical method used to model conditional probabilities for certain events ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between forward and futures contracts?

    Fundamentally, forward and futures contracts have the same function: both types of contracts allow people to buy or sell ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the relationship between the current yield and risk?

    The general relationship between current yield and risk is that they increase in correlation to one another. A higher current ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What assumptions are made when conducting a t-test?

    The common assumptions made when doing a t-test include those regarding the scale of measurement, random sampling, normality ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the utility function and how is it calculated?

    In economics, utility function is an important concept that measures preferences over a set of goods and services. Utility ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is a 'busted' convertible bond?

    In finance, a convertible bond represents a hybrid security that offers debt and equity features and risks. While a convertible ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    What Is A Corporate Credit Rating?

    Is the bond you're buying investment grade, or just junk? Find out how to check the score.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk

    Corporate bonds offer higher yields, but it's important to evaluate the extra risk involved before you buy.
  3. Markets

    Are Your Stocks Doomed?

    When a company is headed for trouble, the warning signs are usually there. Learn how to spot disaster.
  4. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Barclays Aggregate Bond

    Explore information and analysis about the iShares Core U.S. Aggregate Bond ETF that offers broad exposure to the U.S. government and corporate bond market.
  5. Investing

    Short-Term Funds or Fixed Deposits: Is One Better?

    Choosing between short-term funds and fixed deposits? Here's what you need to know.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Present Value Interest Factor of Annuity (PVIFA)

    PVIFA can be used to calculate the present value of a series of annuities by considering cash flows and depreciation.
  7. Economics

    What's a Centrally Planned Economy?

    A centrally planned economy is one where the government controls the country’s supply and demand of goods and services.
  8. Economics

    What are Barriers to Entry?

    A barrier to entry is any obstacle that restricts or impedes a company’s efforts to enter an industry.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: SPDR S&P 500 Trust

    Find out more about the SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust, the characteristics of the exchange traded fund and the suitability of investing in the fund.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Energy Select Sector SPDR

    Find out more about the Energy Select Sector SPDR Fund, the top holdings of this exchange-traded fund and the characteristics of the fund.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Topless Meeting

    A meeting in which participants are not allowed to use laptops. A topless meeting organizer can also ban the use of smartphones, ...
  2. Hedging Transaction

    A type of transaction that limits investment risk with the use of derivatives, such as options and futures contracts. Hedging ...
  3. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  4. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  5. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  6. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!