Deferred Billing

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DEFINITION of 'Deferred Billing'

The act of charging buyers for their purchases, without interest, at a later date. Deferred billing is most often used as a sales promotion technique, enticing potential customers to purchase big-ticket items now rather than later. Car dealerships and those that operate in the "luxury" markets usually offer deferred billing.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Deferred Billing'

From a retailer's standpoint, deferred billing not only increases the buying power of a new or existing customer, it also gives that buyer time to realize they "can't live without" the product purchased. Deferred billing can affect a company's income statement and balance due to revenue recognition differences.

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