Deferred Share

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DEFINITION of 'Deferred Share'

1. A share that does not have any rights to the assets of a company undergoing bankruptcy until all common and preferred shareholders are paid.

2. A method of stock payment to directors and executives of a company through the deposit of shares into a locked account. The value of these shares fluctuate with the market and cannot be accessed by the beneficiary for the purpose of liquidation until they are no longer employees of the company.

3. A share generally issued to company founders that restricts their receipt of dividends until dividends have been distributed to all other classes of shareholders.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Deferred Share'

1. Subordinate to all other classes of common and preferred stock, these shares are last in line when a company goes bankrupt and liquidates all assets.

2. These are different from phantom stocks because they don't allow for payment in cash. Also, rather than actual deposits of securities, companies sometimes maintain bookkeeping entries of cash equaling an offsetting security position. When the executive or director leaves the company, the cash is converted into stocks at market value.

3. No longer commonly used, these shares provided its holders with large dividend payouts only after all other classes of shareholders are paid. Holders of deferred shares had access to all the remaining profits after all obligations were met.

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