Deferred Tax Liability


DEFINITION of 'Deferred Tax Liability'

An account on a company's balance sheet that is a result of temporary differences between the company's accounting and tax carrying values, the anticipated and enacted income tax rate, and estimated taxes payable for the current year. This liability may or may not be realized during any given year, which makes the deferred status appropriate.


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BREAKING DOWN 'Deferred Tax Liability'

Because there are differences between what a company can deduct for tax and accounting purposes, there will be a difference between a company's taxable income and income before tax. A deferred tax liability records the fact that the company will, in the future, pay more income tax because of a transaction that took place during the current period, such as an installment sale receivable.

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  1. What are some examples of a deferred tax liability?

    In the United States, laws allow companies to maintain two separate sets of books for financial and tax purposes. Because ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the justification for allowing deferred tax liabilities?

    A deferred tax liability tracks the temporary difference that arises between a company's income taxes that will be due in ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is a deferred tax liability?

    A deferred tax liability is an account that is listed on a company's balance sheet and occurs when its taxable income is ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does a company derecognize a deferred tax liability?

    Under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP, deferred tax positions must be derecognized during the first ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Does working capital include prepaid expenses?

    The calculation for working capital includes any prepaid expenses that are due within one year, since such prepaid expenses ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do I read and analyze an income statement?

    The income statement, also known as the profit and loss (P&L) statement, is the financial statement that depicts the ... Read Full Answer >>

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