Deferred Tax Liability

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Deferred Tax Liability'

An account on a company's balance sheet that is a result of temporary differences between the company's accounting and tax carrying values, the anticipated and enacted income tax rate, and estimated taxes payable for the current year. This liability may or may not be realized during any given year, which makes the deferred status appropriate.

VIDEO

Loading the player...

BREAKING DOWN 'Deferred Tax Liability'

Because there are differences between what a company can deduct for tax and accounting purposes, there will be a difference between a company's taxable income and income before tax. A deferred tax liability records the fact that the company will, in the future, pay more income tax because of a transaction that took place during the current period, such as an installment sale receivable.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  2. Income Tax

    A tax that governments impose on financial income generated by ...
  3. Liability

    A company's legal debts or obligations that arise during the ...
  4. Income Statement

    A financial statement that measures a company's financial performance ...
  5. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the ...
  6. Receivables Turnover Ratio

    An accounting measure used to quantify a firm's effectiveness ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    Deferred Tax Liability

    Deferred tax liability is a tax that has been assessed or is due for the current period, but has not yet been paid. The deferral arises because of timing differences between the accrual of the ...
  2. Retirement

    Payroll Deductions Pay Off

    Find out how you can bypass or defer taxes on thousands of dollars each year.
  3. Savings

    Saver's Tax Credit: A Retirement Savings Incentive

    Here's another reason to put money toward your retirement nest egg.
  4. Taxes

    10 Money-Saving Year-End Tax Tips

    Getting organized well before the deadline will curb your frustration and your tax liability.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Return on Net Assets

    Return on net assets measures a company’s financial performance.
  6. Credit & Loans

    What's a Nonperforming Loan?

    A nonperforming loan is any borrowed sum where the borrower has failed to pay scheduled payments for at least 90 days.
  7. Economics

    Understanding Cost of Revenue

    The cost of revenue is the total costs a business incurs to manufacture and deliver a product or service.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Cash and Cash Equivalents

    Cash and cash equivalents are items that are either physical currency or liquid investments that can be immediately converted into cash.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Carrying Cost of Inventory

    The carrying cost of inventory is the cost a business pays for holding goods in stock.
  10. Investing

    How To Calculate Minority Interest

    Minority interest calculations require the use of minority shareholders’ percentage ownership of a subsidiary, after controlling interest is acquired.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are some examples of a deferred tax liability?

    In the United States, laws allow companies to maintain two separate sets of books for financial and tax purposes. Because ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the justification for allowing deferred tax liabilities?

    A deferred tax liability tracks the temporary difference that arises between a company's income taxes that will be due in ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is a deferred tax liability?

    A deferred tax liability is an account that is listed on a company's balance sheet and occurs when its taxable income is ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does a company derecognize a deferred tax liability?

    Under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP, deferred tax positions must be derecognized during the first ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the formula for calculating compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in Excel?

    The compound annual growth rate, or CAGR for short, measures the return on an investment over a certain period of time. Below ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  2. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
  3. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  4. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  5. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
  6. Widow's Exemption

    In general terms, a widow's exemption refers to the amount that can be deducted from taxable income by a widow, thereby reducing ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!