Deferred Tax Liability

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DEFINITION of 'Deferred Tax Liability'

An account on a company's balance sheet that is a result of temporary differences between the company's accounting and tax carrying values, the anticipated and enacted income tax rate, and estimated taxes payable for the current year. This liability may or may not be realized during any given year, which makes the deferred status appropriate.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Deferred Tax Liability'

Because there are differences between what a company can deduct for tax and accounting purposes, there will be a difference between a company's taxable income and income before tax. A deferred tax liability records the fact that the company will, in the future, pay more income tax because of a transaction that took place during the current period, such as an installment sale receivable.

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  3. What is a deferred tax liability?

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