Deficit Spending

What is 'Deficit Spending '

Deficit spending is when a government's expenditures exceed its revenues, causing or deepening a deficit. This excess spending needs to be financed through borrowing, likely from foreign governments. The increased government spending can help stimulate the economy as more money flows in, but the jump in borrowing can have an adverse effect by raising interest rates.

BREAKING DOWN 'Deficit Spending '

John Maynard Keynes was an advocate of deficit spending as a fiscal policy tool to help stimulate an economy in recession. During a recession, increased government spending can stimulate business activity, create jobs and spur consumer spending. This creates a multiplier effect in which $1 of government spending helps increase GDP by more than $1. Some complain that the negative effect of deficit spending is that interest rates will increase as the government borrows more. The higher rates make borrowing money more expensive and can stifle growth.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the role of deficit spending in fiscal policy?

    Read about the role deficit spending can play in a government's fiscal policy, and learn why economists are torn about the ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the effect of a fiscal deficit on the economy?

    Take a deeper look into the real impacts of government budget deficits on the economy, and why government financing reduces ... Read Answer >>
  3. Is there any limit on fiscal deficits at the federal level?

    Discover the legal, theoretical, practical and political limitations imposed on the fiscal deficits accumulated by the U.S. ... Read Answer >>
  4. Who thinks fiscal deficits are a good idea?

    Find out why nearly all political actors support the concept of governments incurring fiscal deficits, either explicitly ... Read Answer >>
  5. How long has the U.S. run fiscal deficits?

    Read about the history of deficit spending in the United States, dating back to 1789, and learn about then-Treasury of the ... Read Answer >>
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