Delivery Point

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DEFINITION of 'Delivery Point'

In futures contracts, the delivery point is the place where the commodity will be delivered; the chosen location will have an effect on the net delivery price/cost. The price of commodities differs by location due to the costs of transporting them from their source to the delivery point. Thus, in order to specify a single price of a commodity for contract purposes, the delivery point is an essential detail.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Delivery Point'

The delivery point is most often set at major transportation hubs for the commodity. These places are popular as a matter of convention. For example, Cushing, Oklahoma is a popular delivery point for oil contracts. Meanwhile, the Henry Hub in Erath, Louisiana is a popular delivery point for natural gas contracts.
The change in prices due to the delivery point is readily observable in gasoline prices. If you go on a road trip between cities, you will most often notice gradual changes in the average price of gasoline. Prices are lowest around major oil refining centers. Where gasoline must be delivered over a very long distance, prices will be considerably higher.

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