Demand Schedule

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Demand Schedule'

In economics, the demand schedule is a table of the quantity demanded of a good at different price levels. Thus, given the price level, it is easy to determine the expected quantity demanded. This demand schedule can be graphed as a continuous demand curve on a chart having the Y-axis representing price and the X-axis representing quantity.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Demand Schedule'

A demand schedule is typically used in conjunction with a supply schedule showing the quantity of a good that would be supplied to the market at given price levels. Then, graphing both schedules on a chart with the axes described above, it is possible to obtain a graphical representation of the supply and demand dynamics of a particular market. Ceteris paribus, the market will reach equilibrium where the supply and demand schedules intersect. At this point, the corresponding price will be the equilibrium market price, and the corresponding quantity will be the equilibrium quantity exchanged in the market.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Law Of Demand

    A microeconomic law that states that, all other factors being ...
  2. Demand Theory

    A theory relating to the relationship between consumer demand ...
  3. Change In Demand

    A term used in economics to describe that there has been a change, ...
  4. Demand

    An economic principle that describes a consumer's desire and ...
  5. Aggregate Demand

    The total amount of goods and services demanded in the economy ...
  6. Cape Cod Method

    A method used to calculate loss reserves that uses weights proportional ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How does the market share of a few companies affect the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index ...

    In economics and commercial law, the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) is a widely used measure that indicates the amount ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How can individuals or businesses handle transaction costs for economic externalities?

    Externalities, also known as external economies, and transaction costs are two significant and evolving issues in contemporary ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why should management teams focus more on horizontal integration?

    Management teams should focus more on horizontal integrations because they allow for economies of scale, economies of scope, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do externalities represent profit opportunities?

    Economic externalities expose market transactions where the full costs or benefits of economic activity are not being internalized ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What components are factored in determining net sales?

    The key components that factor into determining net sales include revenue, sales returns, allowances and discounts. Essentially, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does the rule of 70 indicate about a country's future economic growth?

    The rule of 70 could be used to indicate the approximate number of years that it would take a company's economic growth to ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    How Influential Economists Changed Our History

    Find out how these five groundbreaking thinkers laid our financial foundations.
  2. Economics

    Understanding Supply-Side Economics

    Does the amount of goods and services produced set the pace for economic growth? Here are the arguments.
  3. Economics

    The History Of Economic Thought

    Economics is a vital part of every day life. Discover the major players who shaped its development.
  4. Economics

    A Practical Look At Microeconomics

    Learn how individual decision-making turns the gears of our economy.
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Can Keynesian Economics Reduce Boom-Bust Cycles?

    Learn about a British economist's proposed solution to a common economic problem.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  7. Economics

    What is Deadweight Loss?

    Mainly used in economics, deadweight loss can be applied to any deficiency caused by an inefficient allocation of resources.
  8. Economics

    How to Do a Cost-Benefit Analysis

    The benefits of a given situation or business-related action are summed and then the costs associated with taking that action are subtracted.
  9. Economics

    Gaining Market Influence-- The Case of US Shale

    A convergence of sustained bank financing, falling production costs and rising oil prices might position the US shale industry for a greater market role.
  10. Economics

    The Big Chill: What’s Wrong With The U.S. Consumer

    Based on the most recent April data, investors may, once again, be disappointed when the second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) report comes in.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  2. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  3. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  4. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  5. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  6. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
Trading Center