Demand Theory

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DEFINITION of 'Demand Theory'

A theory relating to the relationship between consumer demand for goods and services and their prices. Demand theory forms the basis for the demand curve, which relates consumer desire to the amount of goods available. As more of a good or service is available, demand drops and therefore so does the equilibrium price.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Demand Theory'

Demand theory is one of the core theories of microeconomics. It aims to answer basic questions about how badly people want things, and how demand is impacted by income levels and satisfaction (utility). Based on the perceived utility of goods and services by consumers, companies adjust the supply available and the prices charged.


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