Demand Deposit

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DEFINITION of 'Demand Deposit'

Funds held in an account from which deposited funds can be withdrawn at any time without any advance notice to the depository institution. Demand deposits can be "demanded" by an account holder at any time. Many checking and savings accounts today are demand deposits and are accessible by the account holder through a variety of banking options, including teller, ATM and online banking. In contrast, a term deposit is a type of account which cannot be accessed for a predetermined period (typically the loan's term).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Demand Deposit'

M1 is a category of the money supply that includes demand deposits as well as physical money, such as coins and currency, and Negotiable Order of Withdrawal (NOW) accounts. According to the Federal Reserve's Consumer Compliance Handbook, demand deposit accounts have these characteristics: no maturity period (or an original maturity of fewer than seven days), payable on demand, may be interest bearing, no limit on the number of withdrawals or transfers an account holder may make, and no eligibility requirements.

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